Homicide Features

  • Special Report

    Oct 1 2005

    The “Balibo Five”—30 Years Later

    Shirley Shackleton—whose husband, Australian journalist Greg Shackleton, was murdered in East Timor in 1975—has been asking the same question for 30 years: “I want to know what happened to my husband and his colleagues,” she says. “Why were these people murdered in cold blood?”

  • Behind the Story

    Mar 29 2005

    BTK Killer: Remembering the Victims

    The Wichita Eagle newsroom recently faced a coverage situation that few newspapers encounter: A serial killer resurfacing many years after his last killing.

  • Behind the Story

    Mar 1 2005

    Close Encounters

    In February 1972, I was 18 years old, a couple of months out of high school and beginning a cadetship at the now-dead Sun News Pictorial in Melbourne. It was my first week at the paper and I had been sent for the day to watch police rounds at work.

  • Behind the Story

    Jun 8 2004

    A Different Approach to a Murder Trial

    On Sept. 23, 2002, 18-year-old Rachel Rose Burkheimer was murdered by a group of men and buried in a field in the foothills of the Cascade mountains, east of Everett, Wash. In the months since, the grisly details of the murder have been covered extensively in area newspapers.

  • In Depth

    May 11 2004

    The Till Case: A Picture of Torment

    Mamie Till Mobley — whose son Emmett Till was savagely murdered in Mississippi almost 50 years ago — knew something about respect for victims, fighting for human rights, and the power of photographs.

  • Behind the Story

    May 7 2004

    Reporting Ethically About Victims

    Despite the best intentions of journalists, news reports are sometimes hurtful to victims and their families. In a recent article in Quill, the national magazine of the Society of Professional Journalists, noted writing coach and columnist Paula LaRocque compares two newspapers' coverage of a homicide.

  • From the Academy

    May 9 2003

    Domestic Violence: A Look at Coverage

    When domestic violence causes the death of one or both of the people in a relationship, the local media spotlight usually picks up the tragedy. But the reporting usually reveals little about the painful history that preceded the violence.

  • From the Academy

    May 9 2003

    Domestic Violence: A Look at Coverage

    When domestic violence causes the death of one or both of the people in a relationship, the local media spotlight usually picks up the tragedy. But the reporting usually reveals little about the painful history that preceded the violence.

  • Special Report

    Apr 20 2000

    Columbine: A Willingness to Talk

    One by one, students ran from Columbine High to escape the terror caused by Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold. As teen-agers wandered outside the building, some appeared dazed and confused — shocked by the killings of their teacher and friends. Others cried and wept, unable yet to comprehend the horror of what they or others had witnessed.

  • Tip Sheet

    Apr 20 2000

    Columbine: Interviewing Children

    Gunfire. Children flee their school, looking for police, medics or parents. Instead, many run straight into the arms of reporters primed with questions. What should journalists know about the youngsters they try to interview at moments of crisis?