Resources

  • Fact Sheet

    Jan 1 2009

    Covering Trauma: Impact on Journalists

    An overview of current research on the occupational hazards for journalists covering traumatic events, the risk factors that aggravate those effects and some suggestions for mitigating those factors.

  • Tip Sheet

    Jul 15 2011

    Reporting on Sexual Violence

    Quick tips on covering sexual violence, from preparation to writing the story.

  • Booklet

    Breaking Bad News

    I. Key Points

    The moment when someone is notified of the death of a close family member can be the most important in their lives.

  • Online Learning

    Self-Study Unit 1: Journalism & Trauma

    VI. Best Practices

    Each year the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma recognizes outstanding newspaper coverage of victims and their experiences with the The Dart Award for Excellence in Reporting on Victims of Violence.

  • Tip Sheet

    Tragedies & Journalists

    I. Interviewing

    Always treat victims with dignity and respect - the way you want to be treated in a similar situation. Journalists will always seek to approach survivors, but reporters should do it with sensitivity, including knowing when and how to back off.

  • Journal Library

    Psychology/Psychiatry

    A list of academic publications with a primary focus on psychiatry and psychology.

  • Booklet

    Breaking Bad News

    VI. Practical Details

    Ask the family if there is anyone else they want to contact, or to be with them there now, and how your organisation might help.

  • Online Learning

    Self-Study Unit 1: Journalism & Trauma

    The skills needed to interact with people under such stressful and unpredictable conditions do not usually come naturally. The goal of this module is to explain what traumatic stress is and why it is useful for journalists to know about its effects.

  • Online Learning

    Self-Study Unit 3: Photography & Trauma

    IV. Traumatic Stress and the News Audience

    The field of mass communication study is largely build upon “effects research,” the study of how media content (e.g., movies, newspaper articles, propaganda, television programs, etc.) affects some segment of the population. This research goes back about three-quarters of a century and has yielded a wide range of useful findings.

  • Online Learning

    Self-Study Unit 2: Covering Terrorism

    V. Telling Stories

    The stories journalists tell, visually and verbally, help the public make sense of confusing, threatening times. In fact there is evidence that putting language to traumatic experiences helps individuals cope. Although it is not a stated mission of the press to heal, articulating the event for others may have a therapeutic effect on the larger community.