Resources for Multimedia, Featured Articles

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Let's Talk: Personal Boundaries, Safety & Women in Journalism

Sexual harassment is at the top of the news agenda, and every industry - from politics to arts and entertainment to journalism - is being called to account. Like so many of their counterparts in other fields, women journalists contend with unwanted presumptions and the threat of gender-based violence. The Dart Center asked nine leading women in journalism to share their experiences and to reflect on their own best practices.

Ethical Reporting on Traumatised People

In conjunction with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Dart Centre Asia Pacific presents a new teaching video dealing with the treatment of news sources, "Getting it Right: Ethical Reporting on People Affected by Trauma." The project was developed to supplement teaching materials for journalism educators. Click here for a version with Chinese subtitles.

Symposium: Sandy Hook and Beyond

Click here to watch all of the symposium panels. Click here to read the Live Blog from the event. Click here for program details.

The daylong symposium: Sandy Hook and Beyond: Breaking News, Trauma and Aftermath took place on Monday at Columbia University. Regional and national journalists were joined by community leaders, mental health experts, policy advocates and Sandy Hook families and shared perspectives, discussed lessons learned and pointed the way towards responsible news coverage going forward. 

Telling the Hardest Stories

Winners and judges of the Dart Awards for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma break down the process behind  three exemplary stories.

Columbine: Three Views on the Images

Photographs convey the emotion of a tragedy, but the images may serve to wound as well as to heal. Such was the case with news photos used after the Columbine shootings in April 1999. How do we judge pictures that take us closer to the grief and shock of people whose lives are directly touched by violence?

Self-Study Unit 4: The First 24 Hours

The first 24 hours after a traumatic news event may present a journalist with considerable challenges and opportunities, both professionally and personally. The usual physical and psychological demands of trying to gather facts and write a story under deadline are greatly magnified when trauma is involved, especially when a large number of victims are dead or seriously injured (although even a single victim can be difficult to cover).

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