Tips & Tools

War

War in the 21st century is changing, and so is war reporting. Reporting on war and civil conflict anywhere in the world today means an awareness of the psychic as well as physical toll on soldiers and civilians; sophisticated understanding of human rights; and training in physical safety and emotional resilience. It means, as well, an honest assessment of the impact on journalists of covering war.

Dart Resources

  • Reporting War

    Recommendations for meeting the emotional challenges of covering war, from a group of seasoned veterans. Click here for a Ukrainian translation.

  • In Depth

    Anzac Day: Ethics of Remembrance

    As hundreds of thousands prepare for this Saturday's 100 year anniversary of Anzac Day, journalists must ensure they are promoting healing, not reopening old wounds.

  • In Depth

    On the Front Lines in Ukraine

    In 2011, at the age of 17, Anastasia Vlasova covered protests in Kiev for the first time. Three years later when the first wave of major violence erupted in Ukraine, she was studying journalism in her first semester of graduate school. “I wanted to shake people's shoulders and say, wake up! There's a war going on in our country.” A Q&A with Alan Chin.

  • Dart Award Winner

    Moral Injury

    This provocative three-part series examines the concept of moral injury, a phenomenon where combat or operational experiences transgress deeply held moral and ethical beliefs that undergird a service member’s humanity; often seen as damage to the soul. Judges praised the series for “gracefully and confidently marrying the humanity and understanding of its survivors with a gritty, powerful investigation that breaks new ground.” Originally published in the Huffington Post in March 2014.

  • In Depth

    Syria: Most Dangerous Place for Journalists

    Psychologist Anthony Feinstein examines a confluence of factors that can undermine the emotional well-being of journalists, including the emergence of new threats in Syria, the relentless nature of the conflict and those predominantly tasked with covering it. This piece was originally published in The Globe and Mail.

More Features »

Outside Resources

  • The Iraq War Clinician Guide, 2nd Edition

    National Center for PTSD

    The Iraq War Clinician Guide was developed by members of the National Center for PTSD and the Department of Defense. It was developed specifically for clinicians and addresses the unique needs of veterans of the Iraq war.

  • The Unseen Cost of War: American Minds

    Seatle Post-Intelligencer

    A story about combat-related psychological injury by M.L. Lyke of The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. See the subheading, "GETTING HELP," near the bottom of the story, for an example of a sidebar with contact information for veterans' resources.

  • Tragedies & Journalists

    A 40-page guide to help journalists, photojournalists and editors report on violence while protecting both victims and themselves. Click here for a Ukrainian translation.

  • Reporting War

    Recommendations for meeting the emotional challenges of covering war, from a group of seasoned veterans. Click here for a Ukrainian translation.