Resources for Disaster, Featured Articles

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Living Katrina: 10 Years Later

On the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we asked seven journalists, a news executive and a clinician from the Gulf Coast to reflect on their experiences and what they’ve learned in the decade since. Scroll down for excerpts, and click to the right for full pieces from Eve Troeh, Clarence Williams, Stan Tiner, Debbie Fleming Caffery, John Pope, Joy Osofsky, June Cross, Russell Lewis and Mark Schleifstein.

Covering Natural Disaster in Nepal

Over the last three weeks, a pair of powerful earthquakes shook Nepal, resulting in the deaths of more than 8,000 people. The Dart Center spoke with journalists Russell Lewis and Amantha Perera, and clinician Patrice Keats, about the challenges of covering this tragedy, including verifying information in a time of emergency, speaking with families of missing people, and working through the personal challenges of covering trauma.

Covering Spot News: Tips and Wisdom

In many towns and rural areas of the U.S., emergency-scene access is controlled by fire police, who work in tandem with other first responders. Reporters and editors of the York Daily Record in York, PA have assembled a tipsheet for reporters gathering news of accidents, fires, and larger-scale disasters where fire police come into play. Much of their advice applies as well to emergency scenes patrolled by regular police or fire brigades.

Resources for Covering Natural Disasters

As Hurricane Sandy bears down on the US east coast, the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma is assembling resources for journalists covering the unfolding natural disaster.

A Seismic Jolt: Then the Grim Task Begins

No country is better prepared for earthquakes than Japan. But as the death toll rises from the massive quake and damaged nuclear plants bring more peril, journalists will play a key role in how people make sense of the disaster.

Torn Apart: Reporting Heartbreak

When a crew from Channel Nine's '60 Minutes' interviewed a family who lost their baby girl and both grandmothers to the Queensland floods, some said they exploited their grief. Correspondent Michael Usher begs to differ.

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