Resources for Disaster

133 results found

Covering the Tsunami

In recent years, journalists have become more aware of the emotional aspects of the stories they cover, particularly in the aftermath of tragedy. Nowadays, says David Loyn, the BBC's developing world correspondent, "We get alongside people; we have sympathy with them; we empathise with them." A Frontline Club discussion.

Self-Study Unit 4: The First 24 Hours

The first 24 hours after a traumatic news event may present a journalist with considerable challenges and opportunities, both professionally and personally. The usual physical and psychological demands of trying to gather facts and write a story under deadline are greatly magnified when trauma is involved, especially when a large number of victims are dead or seriously injured (although even a single victim can be difficult to cover).

Covering Two Catastrophes

For those reporting on the natural disasters in China and Myanmar, the Dart Center has assembled tip sheets, advice and reflection from journalists on past catastrophes and other resources of relevance.

Covering Tragedy

2007 Ochberg Fellow Lisa Millar talks about trauma journalism on the National Media Report.

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