Resources for Featured Articles, Disaster

58 results found

Tsunami Relief/Reporter Grief

The word "indescribable" is one of those clichés often used by people too lazy to really describe what they're seeing. But for the first time in my professional career, I found a place where indescribable was actually the most accurate description.

 

Self-Study Unit 4: The First 24 Hours

The first 24 hours after a traumatic news event may present a journalist with considerable challenges and opportunities, both professionally and personally. The usual physical and psychological demands of trying to gather facts and write a story under deadline are greatly magnified when trauma is involved, especially when a large number of victims are dead or seriously injured (although even a single victim can be difficult to cover).

Covering Two Catastrophes

For those reporting on the natural disasters in China and Myanmar, the Dart Center has assembled tip sheets, advice and reflection from journalists on past catastrophes and other resources of relevance.

Weathering the Trauma Storms: Developing Interviewing Techniques

Nearly every journalist in the course of their career will interview people who have experienced significant trauma. But how many receive any training for the task? This article describes how role-playing traumatic incidents might give student journalists valuable insight and hone crucial interviewing skills.

Covering the Tsunami

In 2005, for her master’s project about journalists who cover disaster, Anupama Narayanswamy interviewed a number of journalists who covered the aftermath of the Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami. Here are some of their stories.

Covering the Tsunami

Reflection and advice from six international reporters who reported on the Dec. 26, 2004 tsunami (Yulia Supadmo, Indonesia; Mehul Srivastava, USA; Shahanaaz Habib, Malaysia; Shahidul Alam, Bangladesh; Pia Sarkar, USA; Mona Khanna, USA)

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