Resources for Disaster

133 results found

Shock and Resilience in Samoa

Mata’afa Kene Lesa woke up in heaven Sept. 19 and found himself in hell. When a tsunami struck Upolu, one of Western Samoa’s two main islands, Lesa – the editor of Samoa Observer – was one of the first local journalists to respond, racing to the affected area to be met by scenes of death and devastation.

The Story Behind a 2010 Dart Award Winner

In a Katrina-flooded hospital, doctors injected patients with painkillers and sedatives. Were they easing their pain or speeding their deaths? In a 2009 interview, ProPublica reporter Sheri Fink, winner of the 2010 Dart Award, explains how she pursued the story.

Resources for Reporting on the Jakarta Hotel Bombings

On the morning of Friday, July 17, at least eight people were killed and fifty injured in near-simultaneous bombings of two luxury hotels in Jakarta, Indonesia. It was the first major terrorist attack to take place on Indonesian soil in several years.

To help journalists covering this story, in Indonesia and around the world, the Dart Center is aggregating useful resources. If you have an addition, please add it in the comments.

How Clinicians Can Help Journalists Cover Disaster

"If I asked you to fill in the following statement, 'Journalists are __,' what's the first thing that pops into your head?" Elana Newman, research director of the Dart Center, posed this question Monday as part of a webinar she co-hosted with Dart Center Executive Director Bruce Shapiro. In a disaster, when interviewing and reporting on victims is inevitable, the gap between a clinician's answer and a journalist's answer to this question can be the difference between stories that are both sensitive and effective and stories that are neither.

Sichuan and Beyond

One year ago, a massive earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter scale killed tens of thousands and displaced millions in the Sichuan province of China. In the immediate aftermath, the Chinese government permitted journalists unprecedented access to the devastation. Stories of collapsed schools and miraculous survival brought the world closer to the rural villages of China, but the work took its toll on the storytellers.

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