Resources for Terrorism

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Resources for Covering Mass Shootings

​On Sunday, a gunman opened fire during a church service in Sutherland Springs, Texas, killing 26. Last month, a mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip during a country music festival left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded, the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. Below are tip sheets and other resources for journalists covering these tragedies.

Remembering Seamus Kelters: Pioneering Trauma Journalist

Seamus Kelters, who died suddenly on September 27, 2017, was an influential chronicler of Northern Ireland’s civil conflict and co-author of Lost Lives: The Story of the Men, Women and Children Who Died As A Result of the Northern Ireland Troubles. An early Dart Center Ochberg Fellow, he played a central role in the evolution of trauma-aware journalism. We asked several friends and colleagues for remembrances of Seamus and his work. Below, reflections and recollections by Susan McKay, Scott North, Donna DeCesare, Frank Ochberg, Joe Hight, Elana Newman, Gavin Rees and Bruce ShapiroScroll down for excerpts, and click to the right to read the full pieces.

Lost for Words: Questioning the Relationship between Trauma and Radicalisation

Covering terrorism presents myriad challenges for journalists. How can stories of victims and survivors contribute to the public's understanding of current issues while treating those left reeling with dignity and respect? What responsibility do journalists have in helping audiences understand the motivations of a perpetrator of violence? Here, three experts offer advice on covering traumatic experiences as they relate to radicalisation and terrorism.

Remembering September 11

Anniversaries mark progress and the passage of time. They can also conjure memories we may not always want to face. On this anniversary of the September 11 attacks, the Dart Center calls attention to a uniquely eloquent journalistic record of the attacks' long aftermath; to a powerful tenth anniversary essay on personal loss and collective historical memory; and to resources available as we seek to better cover, and understand, the longterm effects of horrific events.

Safety Guidelines for Covering Nuclear Incidents

Journalists who cover news related to nuclear issues are frequently among the first people on the scene when a radiation incident occurs, but their safety is often overlooked, leaving them vulnerable to radiation exposure and other potential harm. To combat that risk, the non-profit group Atomic Reporters, in partnership with the Stanley Foundation, has released a safety guide highlighting basic steps to take when covering these complex issues.

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