Resources for Aftermath & Anniversaries

77 results found

Remembering Seamus Kelters: Pioneering Trauma Journalist

Seamus Kelters, who died suddenly on September 27, 2017, was an influential chronicler of Northern Ireland’s civil conflict and co-author of Lost Lives: The Story of the Men, Women and Children Who Died As A Result of the Northern Ireland Troubles. An early Dart Center Ochberg Fellow, he played a central role in the evolution of trauma-aware journalism. We asked several friends and colleagues for remembrances of Seamus and his work. Below, reflections and recollections by Susan McKay, Scott North, Donna DeCesare, Frank Ochberg, Joe Hight, Elana Newman, Gavin Rees and Bruce ShapiroScroll down for excerpts, and click to the right to read the full pieces.

Impunity in Mexico: Remembering Javier Valdez

One month after Mexican journalist Javier Valdez was assassinated outside his workplace, we asked seven journalists to reflect on his murder and the impact of violence and impunity on their work. Below, Donna DeCesare introduces pieces by Melissa del Bosque, Javier Garza, Michel Marizco, Maria Teresa Ronderos, Christopher Sherman and ​Marcela Turati. Scroll down for excerpts, and click to the right to read the full pieces.

Looking Back on Disaster

Founded twenty-five years ago this month, Disaster Action has helped to reshape how the British political and legal systems respond to the needs of victims and survivors of public tragedies. In this edited interview, Pam Dix and Anne Eyre discuss their experiences with such disasters as Hillsborough, Lockerbie and the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, and its relevance for journalists covering the still unfolding aftermath of such events.

Remembering September 11

Anniversaries mark progress and the passage of time. They can also conjure memories we may not always want to face. On this anniversary of the September 11 attacks, the Dart Center calls attention to a uniquely eloquent journalistic record of the attacks' long aftermath; to a powerful tenth anniversary essay on personal loss and collective historical memory; and to resources available as we seek to better cover, and understand, the longterm effects of horrific events.

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