Classroom Resources

No matter what the beat or medium, the work of journalism will likely place young journalists face to face with human tragedy. Rookie reporters and photographers are often assigned to cover police or courts, or are asked to help cover a community tragedy. Whether covering homicide, campus sexual assault, accidental death or a natural disaster, few student journalists are trained to recognize trauma and stress reactions in survivors, to make informed ethical choices about trauma news, or to deal with their own emotional reactions while on the job.

The Dart Center strongly recommends that basic trauma awareness be integrated into all journalism education, ranging from basic modules in reporting and ethics to any specialized in-depth courses on subjects related to covering violence and tragedy. As part of the basic goal of journalism education all students should acquire core competency in trauma-aware newsgathering, interviewing, ethics and self-care. The resources here - produced by leading journalism educators around the world - will help prepare educators to teach effective trauma journalism including the art of newsgathering, storytelling, and self care in the midst of human tragedy and its aftermath.  The resources here - produced by leading journalism educators around the world - will help prepare educators to teach effective trauma journalism including the art of newsgathering, storytelling, and self care in the midst of human tragedy and its aftermath. 

Resources for Journalism Educators

To assist journalism educators and college media advisors in training the next generation of journalists, the Dart Center is pleased to announce a new compendium of resources developed in collaboration with Dart Academic Fellow and San Diego State Associate Professor of Journalism, Amy Schmitz Weiss. As you finalize curriculums and prepare for the school year, we hope you will consult this comprehensive package.

Classroom Resources