Disaster

Along with emergency professionals, journalists are often "first responders" when an earthquake or a hurricane devastate a community. Large-scale disasters challenge reporters on the ground and newsroom managers alike, both in the midst of a breaking crisis and for months or years afterward.

Recent Posts

  • Nepal Earthquake: One Year Later

    One year after a pair of powerful earthquakes shook Nepal, resulting in the deaths of more than 8,000 people, Ochberg Fellow and Dart Asia Pacific Regional Facilitator Amantha Perera writes about the challenges of covering this tragedy and its aftermath, featuring lessons learned from Nepali journalists Sudarshan Khatiwada, Makar Shrestha and Sangita Shrestha. With reporting by Deepak Adhikari in Kathmandu.

  • Arun Karki: Reporting Without a Home

    After a devastating earthquake upended Nepal in April, video journalist Arun Karki and his family were left homeless. Against his family’s wishes, Karki headed straight to his office at Nepal Television News where, for the next few months, he scrubbed through thousands of hours of graphic footage, producing reports on the quake’s aftermath. Karki shared his experiences with the Dart Center, and offered tips for journalists covering natural disasters around the globe.

  • Living Katrina: 10 Years Later

    On the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we asked seven journalists, a news executive and a clinician from the Gulf Coast to reflect on their experiences and what they’ve learned in the decade since. Scroll down for excerpts, and click to the right for full pieces from Eve Troeh, Clarence Williams, Stan Tiner, Debbie Fleming Caffery, John Pope, Joy Osofsky, June Cross, Russell Lewis and Mark Schleifstein.

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